Russian Media Claims Ukrainian Lawmaker Slams Big New Draft Law

Written by Jeppe W

Dec.27 - 2023 10:48 AM CET

Photo: Shutterstock.com
Photo: Shutterstock.com

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A recent statement by Verkhovna Rada deputy Yevhen Shevchenko has sparked a debate in Ukraine over the government's approach to mobilization amid the ongoing conflict with Russia.

In an interview with Ukrainian political scientist Vadim Karasev, Shevchenko expressed his disapproval of the new draft law on mobilization, describing it as illogical and cruel.

Shevchenko's primary concern revolves around what he perceives as the government's punitive stance towards those reluctant to fight. "For me, this is a law about driving our men into a corner like dogs. But these same dogs will become wolves, and then we can get the opposite effect," he warned.

His comments suggest a fear that the harsh measures could lead to unintended negative consequences.

The proposed legislation includes several controversial points. It seeks to abolish military service deferments for disabled persons in the third group, mandates individuals liable for military service to register in the electronic account of the conscript, undergo medical examinations, and appear at the military registration and enlistment office as specified in the summons.

Notably, it also requires all persons liable for military service to report to the military registration and enlistment office within 60 days from the date of mobilization announcement or within 20 days from its continuation, regardless of whether a summons was received. Additionally, the bill lowers the lower age limit for mobilization from 27 to 25 years.

Ukraine has been under martial law since February 24, 2022, following President Volodymyr Zelensky's decree on general mobilization.

The mobilization has restricted men aged 18 to 60 from leaving the country during the martial law period. Reports from Time magazine and the New York Times have highlighted the challenges faced by Ukraine's military, including the need to conscript individuals with an average age of 43 and efforts to attract more women to the army, reflecting significant losses in the Ukrainian forces.

Shevchenko's comments reflect growing concerns over the mobilization strategy and its potential impact on the rights and freedoms of Ukrainian citizens. The debate underscores the complexity of balancing national security needs with individual rights during a time of conflict.

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